Killing hogs and curing pork
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Killing hogs and curing pork

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Meat -- Preservation,
  • Pork,
  • Slaughtering and slaughter-houses

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementF.G. Ashbrook and G.A. Anthony.
SeriesFarmers" bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 913., Farmers" bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 913.
ContributionsAnthony, G. A. 1873-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsS21 .A6
The Physical Object
Pagination40 p. :
Number of Pages40
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18624389M
LC Control Number17001241
OCLC/WorldCa4444030

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  Killing hogs and curing pork. by. Ashbrook, F. G. (Frank Getz), Publication date. Topics. Meat Preservation, Pork, Slaughtering and slaughter-houses, Meat -- Preservation. Publisher. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.   An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk. Killing hogs and curing pork by Ashbrook, F. G.; Anthony, G. A. Publication date Topics Meat Preservation, Pork, Slaughtering and slaughter-houses. Killing Hogs and Curing Pork by U. S. Dept Of Agriculture (, Paperback) for sale online.   USDA Hog Killing BOOK @ AMAZON: – This special re-print edition of “Killing Hogs and Curing Pork” has not been available to those interested in farm butchering since it first appeared on the scene back in The demand for this rare book has brought forth the much needed reprint of this famous classic work. SEE BOOK @AMAZON $

The description of the process in the book was something I remember vividly, particularly the section about them playing with a pig bladder balloon and eating crispy bacon tails. Growing up, I also had the opportunity to live in rural America, where the butcher shop didn’t hide the fact that meat came from animals—half hogs and steers hung.   Fresh, home-processed wild pigs can't be beaten, and the savings are well worth the time and hunting and processing wild hog meat is a great way to stock your freezer for the winter. In some areas, hogs are a plentiful nuisance, so you're helping to cut down the population while providing meat for your family.   Pork products are only relatively safe to eat because they are chilled, well-cooked, or long-cured prior to consumption. As long as you apply the same processes to your pork products at home, your risks are the same at home as they are at the grocery store. Even if you bust a gut! Busting a gut is stinky and messy. Do It Yourself With The ‘Complete Book of Butchering, Smoking, Curing, and Sausage Making’ There are two ways to salt-cure meat. In both cases, the flavor from the cure is derived from salt and whatever other flavors are added to the curing mixture such as sugars (honey or brown) and spices (pepper, rosemary, bay leaves).

Pig slaughter caught on hidden camera inside a USDA-approved and inspected slaughterhouse that supplies Hormel.. The pig slaughter plant featured in this video is one of 5 facilities in the U.S., operating under a pilot program that allows high speed slaughter. The home curing of pork is a good practice and should be more extensively adopted. This publication explains how to slaughter hogs and cure pork. Butchering and cutting up the carcass, lard rendering, brine and dry curing, smoking, and sausage making are all discussed in the following pages. We add a little flavor to the show by showing you how the old timers cured meat. Tim Farmer heads back to Bill Dixon's smokehouse in Harlan County. With pork. "Slaughtering Hogs" and "Curing and Smoking Hogs" Summary In "Slaughtering Hogs," the author begins by stressing the importance of hogs as meat for early settlers of the Appalachian Mountains. Many individuals kept hundreds of head for use in the winter months, and Bill Lamb, a local resident, notes that the best hogs were fed with chestnuts.